Poetry from Emma Bernstein

Chained Woman By Emma Bernstein Andromeda, Flesh spun into stars Crooked limbs Stretched like galaxies across blueberry-velvet skies You tremor above pavement Cast your frail glow on autumn evenings Andromeda, My lonely sacrifice Appease our gods With their ice-carved features Find me absolution for my sins Andromeda, My wayward flame Bound to stone Bound to […]

Read More

Essay from Ayokunle Adeleye

Again on the ASUU Strike. (ASUU: Academic Staff Union of Universities) There are hints, yes, insinuations, that the President, if ASUU rejects his next (perhaps, last) offer, will forcefully open the Universities- and perhaps Polytechnics, since ASUP is also on strike. I’m forced to ask (myself), Can that happen? Will he drag the lecturers back […]

Read More

Poetry from Leemond Dollins

  A day on the Mat A pill in my hand and four on the floor. The sage stretches forward and down to release the hips and something more, something collective and shared with the group. A yogi wet dream seems to slip between the mat and the breath. Truth soothes. The truth is the […]

Read More

Charlotte Shea reviews Dr. Illah Reza Nourbakhsh’s Robot Futures

  I attended a robotics media panel recently and was disheartened when the topics were announced. Three public voices central to communicating the complexities of robotics were about to engage us in an hour-long discussion on the two most contrived topics: drones, and robots taking our jobs. I patiently sat to indulge the predictable concerns, […]

Read More

Poetry from Charles Mazzarella

The Mystery of Written Word From deep slumber does this pen arise But cause the motion giver to be evermore a blither. For sleep does at times but whisper my name, Though I answer not its call. Important more for me is this: That the words upon which you now gaze, Create themselves from brain […]

Read More

Kimberly Brown on Jonathan Humphries’ Windham’s Rembrandt

Kimberly Brown on Jonathan Humphries’ Windham’s Rembrandt, a memoir of his ex-Marine father’s work as Texas’ first prison art teacher A noble and peaceful man embarks on an adventure when he decides to take a job in a Texas prison. James feels privileged to be able to teach art. However, by teaching art in prison, […]

Read More

Short story from Irving Greenfield

  THE SORROWS OF SANTA by Irving A Greenfield With the exception of a white beard, he wore the red uniform of his calling. We shared a small, round table in Starbucks, a short distance from the department store where I was sure he worked. A portly man, with a large square head, and large […]

Read More