Essay from Ali Akramov

Effect of floods on geological processes in mountains

 National University of Uzbekistan

 Faculty of Hydrometeorology

 1st year student Akramova Shiringul

 Furqatjon’s daughter.

 e-mail: akramovali32@gmail.com

 Phone: +998995524473

 Abstract: Floods have a great influence on the geological processes in the mountains. As a result of the movement of the floods, complex processes such as decay, washing, erosion occur in the mountains. This causes the geological composition of the mountains to change.

Key words: floods, geological processes, terrain, meteorological phenomena, hydrological conditions, ponds, physiography.

Key words: floods, geological processes, terrain, meteorological phenomena, hydrological conditions, ponds, physiography.

Key words: flooding, geological processes, relief, meteorological phenomena,
Hydrological conditions, water, physiography.


 Floods are caused by various geophysical mechanisms in a wide range and of great power. Objectives are considered on geological time and space scales, but the main criteria of climatic, topographical and geological factors of the channel predictably influence and limit the size and extent of local floods in floodplains. Many of these effects are specific and not topographical or climatic, with damage, for example, local correlation of specific types of floods. But some are less specific measures, including geological control over the time, location, connection and magnitude of natural dam failures. In this paper, we describe the main factors that affect the magnitude or insignificance of floods and how these factors vary temporally and spatially over geologic time and spatial scales. 

Or risks are addressed. Even experienced hydrologists and geologists each consider floods to be of scientific interest beyond modern experience, such as the Pleistocene Missoula floods. Such large floods are unique. 1. Due to its uniqueness and role in shaping the landscape, it played an interesting and dramatic role in phrasing 2. Flashes for inquiry and debate, but they are not and usually considered. Normal geophysical component 3. Certificate behavior. 

But really, floods of any size and source can be considered a geological process on the same level as any other Earth system, so tectonics and the atmosphere have attributes, causes, effects, and even correlations. Causes processes such as circulation. Practitioners of paleoflood hydrology, who study floods of various scales and in different geologic periods and environments [Kochel et al. Baker, 1982], well-placed rates and the evaluation, description, and even quantification of these correlations. Indeed, many of the articles in this volume present examples of floods that occur under certain conditions as a result of these geological, physiographic, and climatic interactions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general context for individual paleoflood studies on landscapes. 

Systematic characterization of the spatial and temporal distribution of large floods and flood-causing mechanisms can thus provide a framework for the ecological status of floods and floods in Earth’s history. These results are consistent with the vapor and physical limits for surface flooding determined from total snow. A closer look at flood-generating processes From an empirical perspective, the magnitude, duration, and extent of river floods vary greatly depending on the source mechanism, global location, geology, and physiography, but despite this variation, how large a flood is.

There are real physical limits to what can be. Meteorological floods are caused by various types of storms that deliver a volume of water up to 1011 m3 for several days or weeks, as well as from seasonally stable climatic conditions that deliver more than 1012 m3 for several weeks or months, and the highest leads to flow. As much as 105 m³/s in large, continental-scale basins. The main limits for meteorological flooding depend, first of all, on the level and volume of precipitation, as well as on the efficiency of distribution of precipitation concentrates to channel networks. 

Global and US flood records show that primarily for basins affected by individual storms, the largest flows occur in areas where atmospheric moisture or storm tracks are intercepted by local topographic relief.For larger basins, the largest fluxes result from seasonally stable climate patterns and, on a global basis, tend to be in tropical regions with more moisture. The contribution of high-relief topography to meteorological flooding is particularly noteworthy because of its dual effects of (1) raising atmospheric moisture, thereby increasing local precipitation, and (2) facilitating more rapid concentration of runoff into channels. 

Floods from dam failures and terrestrial fresh water sources such as lakes and glaciers have similar total volumes to meteorological floods, up to 1013 m3, but larger 2-107 m³/s with waste. During the Pleistocene Ice Age, glaciers and changing hydrologic conditions disrupted drainage systems, causing the largest well-documented dam floods to breach ice dams and basin divides of the Great Lakes. From the Global perspective, the magnitude, duration, and extent of river floods vary greatly depending on the source mechanism, global location, geology, and physiography, but despite this variation, there are real physical limits to how large a flood can be. 

Meteorological floods are caused by various types of storms that deliver a volume of water up to 1011 m3 for several days or weeks, as well as from seasonally stable climatic conditions that deliver more than 1012 m3 for several weeks or months, and the highest leads to flow. As much as 105 m³/s in large, continental-scale basins. The main limits for meteorological flooding depend, first of all, on the level and volume of precipitation, as well as on the efficiency of distribution of precipitation concentrates to channel networks.

Global and US Water Regulations indicate that the largest runoff for a basin affected by individual storms in the first instance is when atmospheric moisture or storm tracks are intercepted by topography. For the larger basins, the largest fluxes result from seasonal climate conditions and occur in the tropics, where there is more moisture on a global basis. The contribution of relief topography to meteorological flooding is particularly high because of its two-fold effect of (1) raising atmospheric moisture, thereby increasing precipitation, and (2) concentrating flow movement into channels.  

Floods from external dams and terrestrial freshwater sources such as lakes and glaciers have total volumes similar to meteorological floods, up to 1013 m3, but less than 2-107 m³/s. L is greater. With. The Pleistocene glacial reglaciations disrupted fluctuating hydrologic resource systems, leading to the failure of ice dams and basin divides of the Great Lakes, the largest well-documented dam floods. From the Global perspective, the magnitude of river floods, a very global place, varies with water volume and power source mechanism, geology, and physiography, but depending on the difference, there are real physical limits to how large flood transport can be. Meteor floods are caused by seasonal climatic conditions of several days or weeks up to 1011 3, while the control of the water volume is different, leads to big. As much as 105 m³/s in large, continental-scale basins.

The main limits for meteorological flooding depend, first of all, on the level and volume of precipitation, as well as on the efficiency of distribution of precipitation concentrates to channel networks. Global and US flood records show that primarily for basins affected by individual storms, the largest flows occur in areas where atmospheric moisture or storm tracks are intercepted by local topographic relief. 

For larger basins, the largest fluxes result from seasonally stable climate patterns and, on a global basis, tend to be in tropical regions with more moisture. The contribution of high-relief topography to meteorological flooding is particularly noteworthy because of its dual effects of (1) raising atmospheric moisture, thereby increasing local precipitation, and (2) facilitating more rapid concentration of runoff into channels. 

Floods from dam failures and terrestrial fresh water sources such as lakes and glaciers have similar total volumes to meteorological floods, up to 1013 m3, but larger 2-107 m³/s with waste. During the Pleistocene Ice Age, glaciers and changing hydrologic conditions disrupted drainage systems, causing the largest well-documented dam floods to breach ice dams and basin divides of the Great Lakes. 

From the Global perspective, the magnitude, duration, and extent of river floods vary greatly depending on the source mechanism, global location, geology, and physiography, but despite this variation, there are real physical limits to how large a flood can be. Meteorological floods are caused by various types of storms that deliver a volume of water up to 1011 m3 for several days or weeks, as well as from seasonally stable climatic conditions that deliver more than 1012 m3 for several weeks or months, and the highest leads to flow. As much as 105 m³/s in large, continental-scale basins. The main limits for meteorological flooding depend, first of all, on the level and volume of precipitation, as well as on the efficiency of distribution of precipitation concentrates to channel networks. 

Global and US flood records show that primarily for basins affected by individual storms, the largest flows occur in areas where atmospheric moisture or storm tracks are intercepted by local topographic relief. For larger basins, the largest fluxes result from seasonally stable climate patterns and, on a global basis, tend to be in tropical regions with more moisture. The contribution of high-relief topography to meteorological flooding is particularly noteworthy because of its dual effects of (1) raising atmospheric moisture, thereby increasing local precipitation, and (2) facilitating more rapid concentration of runoff into channels. 

Floods from dam failures and terrestrial fresh water sources such as lakes and glaciers have similar total volumes to meteorological floods, up to 1013 m3, but larger 2-107 m³/s with waste. During the Pleistocene Ice Age, glaciers and changing hydrologic conditions disrupted drainage systems, causing the largest well-documented dam floods to breach ice dams and basin divides of the Great Lakes.

From the Global perspective, the magnitude, duration, and extent of river floods vary greatly depending on the source mechanism, global location, geology, and physiography, but despite this variation, there are real physical limits to how large a flood can be. Meteorological floods are caused by various types of storms that deliver a volume of water up to 1011 m3 for several days or weeks, as well as from seasonally stable climatic conditions that deliver more than 1012 m3 for several weeks or months, and the highest leads to flow. As much as 105 m³/s in large, continental-scale basins. The main limits for meteorological flooding depend, first of all, on the level and volume of precipitation, as well as on the efficiency of distribution of precipitation concentrates to channel networks.


REFERENCES

 1.E. Costa, U.S. Geological Survey, 10615 Sf Cherry Blossom

Dr., Portland OR, 97216.

G. E. Grant, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research

Station, 3200 Jefferson Way, Corvallis. OR 97331

lE. O’Connor, U.S. Geological Survey, 10615 SE Cherry

1990 Blossom Dr., Portland OR, 97216. (oconnor(usgsgov)

One thought on “Essay from Ali Akramov

  1. Ali Akramov,
    This is a well researched academic essay. Well done!
    My only observation for you is: the frist three sentences in passage no. 7 are repeated as a new passage (no. 13). Please delete this repetition.
    And i would also like to suggest that in order to make your academic essay more aesthetically pleasing, maybe you should consider using main headings and sub-headings.
    With regard to compiling the bibliography, you should also consider adhering to a proper referencing system e.g. APA and/or Harvard, or whichever your Uni/Institution requires you to follow.
    All the best to you for your academic degree, future academic essays, and (miscelleneous) literary endeavours.
    Best regards,
    Saad Ali

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